JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting 2017

Presentation information

[EE] Oral

H (Human Geosciences) » H-TT Technology & Techniques

[H-TT19] [EE] GEOSCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS OF HIGH-DEFINITION TOPOGRAPHY AND GEOPHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS

Tue. May 23, 2017 1:45 PM - 3:15 PM 103 (International Conference Hall 1F)

convener:Yuichi S.Hayakawa(Center for Spatial Information Science, The University of Tokyo), Hiroshi, P. Sato(College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University), Shigekazu Kusumoto(Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama), Shoichiro Uchiyama(National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention), Chairperson:Yuichi Hayakawa(Center for Spatial Information Science, The University of Tokyo), Chairperson:Hiroshi Sato(College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University), Chairperson:Shoichiro Uchiyama(National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention), Chairperson:Shigekazu Kusumoto(Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama)

2:45 PM - 3:00 PM

[HTT19-04] Time series analysis of TLS-derived point clouds for shallow landslides in Aso region, Kumamoto, Japan

*Yasutaka Haneda1, Takashi Oguchi2, Yuichi S. Hayakawa2, Hitoshi SAITO3 (1.Graduate School of Frontier Science, The University of Tokyo, 2.Center for Spatial Information Science, The University of Tokyo, 3.College of Economics, Kanto Gakuin University)

Keywords: The 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake, Terrestrial laser scanning, Point clouds, High-definition topographical data, Landslides, Time series analysis

The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake triggered many landslides on steep slopes in the Sensuikyo area near the Aso Volcano in Kumamoto, western Japan. In this research, we use the terrestrial laser scanning to obtain detailed point cloud data of the slopes including landslides before and after the earthquake. We analyze the point cloud data regarding the changes in elevation and topographic profiles. It is observed that new landslides were formed by the earthquake on slopes where landslides formed by the heavy rainfall in July 2012 have already been present. The depth of the earthquake-derived landslides is about 6 m, which is deeper than the past landslides caused by heavy rainfalls. We also found that the longitudinal profiles of the earthquake-driven landslides exhibit different shapes from those of the rainfall-triggered landslides: The former is more curved, while the latter is straight. This suggests that the landslides by the earthquake have occurred along a slip surface deeper than that of the rainfall-derived landslides. Also, further decreases in elevation were partially observed on the ridge, the middle part of the slope, and the valley bottom after the earthquake. This suggests that there were further collapses and erosion possibly caused by a relatively heavy rainfall in June 2016.