2018 International Conference on Solid State Devices and Materials

Awards

Awards

There are three categories of awards presented to authors who reported technical papers at the SSDM conferences: SSDM Award, SSDM Paper Award, and SSDM Young Researcher Award, except as needed basis. Awards proposed by the organizing committee in the current year. The SSDM Award will be presented to researchers who contributed an outstanding paper at past SSDM. The Award Committee selects this award. The SSDM Paper Award will be presented to authors who presented the best paper at the previous year's SSDM. The SSDM Young Researcher Award will be given to a few young researchers, not older than thirty-three, who presented excellent papers at the previous year's SSDM. The SSDM Paper Award and the SSDM Young Researcher Award are nominated by the Program Committee and decided by the Organizing Committee.
SSDM2018 presents the SSDM Award to an outstanding paper; Tadashi Shibata, Hideo Kosaka, Hiroshi Ishii and Tadahiro Ohmi, of Tohoku University for the presentation of the paper entitled “A Neuron-MOS Neural Network Using Low-Power Self-Learning-Compatible Synapse Cells” presented as paper No.S-IV-3 at the SSDM1994, held in Yokohama.
The SSDM Paper Award is presented to Kensuke Ito, Kotaro Nishimura, Keiji Ikeda, Kazuya Matsuzawa, Tsutomu Tezuka and Toshiya Sakata, for a paper entitled “Ultra-sensitive biosensor with capacitive coupling-gate InGaZnO-based FET” which was presented at the SSDM2017 held in Sendai.
The SSDM Young Researcher Award is given to five researchers: (1) Xu Wang, who presented a paper entitled "A new kinetic model for thermal oxidation of Ge"; (2) Wei-Ting Hsieh, who presented a paper entitled "Differential Contact RRAM Pair for Advanced CMOS Logic NVM applications"; (3) Takuya Harashima, who presented a paper entitled "Development of Vertically-Stacked Multi-Shank Si Neural Probe Array with Sharpened Tip for Cubic Spatial Recording"; (4) Tian Li, who presented a paper entitled "Current Density Dependence of Asymmetric Magnetoresistance in Pt/Py Bilayers under Various Magnetic Field Strength”; (5) Satoshi Okuda, who presented a paper entitled "Chemical Sensing using Graphene-based Surface-Acoustic-Wave Sensor".

Awards in the SSDM2018
SSDM Award

"A Neuron-MOS Neural Network Using Low-Power Self-Learning-Compatible Synapse Cells"

Tadashi SHIBATA, Hideo KOSAKA, Hiroshi ISHII, and Tadahiro OHMI
Department of Electronic Engineering, Tohoku University
Presentation No. S-IV-3, presented at the 26th International Conference on Solid State Devices and Materials (1994), Yokohama
In this work, a hierarchical neural network was constructed as a real circuit on a Si LSI with “neuron MOS” devices in which multiple input gates were capacitively coupled to a floating gate and the on-line learning was demonstrated. The 1990s, when this paper was published, was the time of the second boom of artificial intelligence (AI), and research focused on hardware for realizing AI became active. For example, to realize a neural network with a brainlike structure, various methods using nonvolatile memory and logic devices were proposed and studied. In conventional analog circuits, to realize the product-sum operation, which is frequently used in the calculation of a neural network, it is necessary to express a signal at the current level and realize the calculation by current addition or signal addition at the charge level. However, with these conventional methods, there are problems such as large areas of circuits, high power consumption, and increase in delay time, which have restricted the development of neural networks with large-scale integration.
In the paper, the authors showed that the use of "neuron-MOS", which has high compatibility with digital circuits, enabled the product-sum operation with voltage linear adder circuits, and demonstrated on-line learning with the hierarchical neural network for the first time.
Currently, the usefulness of AI is recognized, and the method of realizing AI hardware is drawing attention for the objective of further development of applications. Since this work is a pioneering research in this field and has had a great impact on academic and industrial communities, we present this SSDM Award here and honor its achievements.
Tadashi Shibata
The Japan Society of Applied Physics
Tadashi Shibata was born in Japan in 1948, and received the B.S degree in electrical engineering and the MS degrees in material science both from Osaka University, and the Ph.D. degree from The University of Tokyo, in 1971, 1973 and 1984, respectively.
From 1974 to 1986, he was with Toshiba Corporation, where he worked as a VLSI process and device engineer. During the period of 1978 to 1980, he was a Visiting Research Associate at Stanford University, where he studied the laser beam processing of silicide, polysilicon, and superconducting materials. From 1986 to 1997, he was Associate Professor at Tohoku University, where he worked on ultra-clean technology and low-temperature processing. Since the invention of a new functional device called Neuron MOS Transistor (MOS) in 1989, his research interest shifted from devices and materials to circuits and systems. In 1997, he became Professor at The University of Tokyo and did research on building human-like intelligent systems on VLSI chips. He explored biologically-inspired as well as psychologically-inspired brain models for implementing brain-mimicking functions directly on silicon chips. In 2013, he retired and became Professor emeritus of The University of Tokyo. Currently he is serving as Editor-in-Chief of Applied Physics Express and Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.
Dr. Shibata is a life member of the IEEE Electron Devices Society, Circuits & Systems Society and Computer Society, and a fellow member of the Japan Society of Applied Physics.
Hideo Kosaka
Sony Imaging Products & Solutions Inc.
Hideo Kosaka was born in Saitama, Japan, in 1967. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electronic engineering both from Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, in 1992 and 1994, respectively.
When he was a graduate school student at Tohoku University, he studied the hardware implementation of neural networks using Neuron MOS transistors. In 1994, he joined Research Center of Sony Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa, Japan, where he worked on the circuit design of microprocessors. At present, he is working for Sony Imaging Products & Solutions Inc., Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan, and being engaged in the development of Contactless IC Card Technology, FeliCa. His work includes the LSI chip design for near field communication, their module design and development, the electronic paper display system development including its specialized chip, and so forth. He is currently working on the development of IC card for Transit Ticket and e-Money.
Hiroshi Ishii
NXP Semiconductors
Hiroshi Ishii was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1965. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in polymer chemistry both from Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan, in 1989 and 1991, respectively.
He studied the hardware implementation of neural networks using Neuron MOS transistors at Tohoku University as a visiting researcher from Motorola Inc.. In 1993, he joined Tohoku Semiconductor Co., Sendai, Japan, where he worked on the process development for various devices, DRAM, MCU, MEMS and so on. At present, he is working for NXP semiconductors, Texas, USA as a MEMS device engineer for accelerometers.
Tadahiro Ohmi
Tohoku University
Tadahiro Ohmi was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1939. He received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, in 1961, 1963, and 1966, respectively.
He was a Research Associate with the Department of Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology. In 1972, he moved to the Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, as a Research Associate, where he became an Associate Professor in 1976. He was a Full Professor with the Department of Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, in 1985, and with the New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, in 1998. In 2002, he was titled Professor Emeritus by Tohoku University. He has published 1635 original papers and holds 1795 patent applications. He engaged in research on high-performance semiconductor devices and advanced semiconductor process technologies, such as ultraclean technology.
Dr. Ohmi was the recipient the Medal with Purple Ribbon from the Government of Japan and the Best Collaboration Award (the Prime Minister's Award) in 2003.
To our regret, Dr. Ohmi passed away at 77 years old in 2016.

SSDM Paper Award

Presentation No. F-3-04

“Ultra-sensitive biosensor with capacitive coupling-gate InGaZnO-based FET”

Kensuke Ito
The University of Tokyo
Kensuke Ito received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in engineering from the University of Tokyo, Japan, in 2016 and 2018, respectively. He had been engaged in research on InGaZnO-TFTs for biosensors and now he works at Fujifilm, Japan.
Kotaro Nishimura
Sony Semiconductor Solutions Corporation
Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo
Undergraduate, Materials Engineering (2012-2013), Tokyo, Japan
Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo
Master, Materials Engineering (2014-2015), Tokyo, Japan
Sony Semiconductor Solutions Corporation (2016-present), Kanagawa, Japan
Keiji Ikeda
Toshiba Memory Corporation
He received the M.E. and Ph. D. degrees in physical electronics from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan in 1998 and 2001, respectively. In 2001, he joined Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Japan, where he has engaged in research and development of 45-nm-node CMOS devices for high-performance computing applications. In 2009, he moved to the Advanced LSI Technology Laboratory, Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Japan. From 2011 to 2014, he was with the Green Nanoelectronics Center (GNC), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Japan, as an assignee from Toshiba Corporation for the FIRST Program, where he has engaged in research and development of strained-Ge /III-V nanowire CMOS devices. Currently, he is working on research and development of new channel material transistors for advanced memory devices in Toshiba Memory Corporation. Dr. Ikeda is a member of the IEEE Electron Devices Society and the Japan Society of Applied Physics. He was the recipient of the 41st SSDM Paper Award in 2009.
Kazuya Matsuzawa
Toshiba Memory Corporation
Kazuya Matsuzawa was born in Tokyo, Japan in 1962. He received the B. S. and M. S. degrees in electric engineering from Keio University, Japan in 1985 and 1987 respectively and the Ph. D. degree from Hiroshima University, Japan in 2006. He joined the Process Research Development of the Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation, Japan in 1987. Since 2018 he is with Institute of Memory Technology Research & Development, Toshiba Memory Corporation, where he is currently working on development of physical models for the device simulation.
Tsutomu Tezuka
Toshiba Memory Corporation
Tsutomu Tezuka received B.S. and M.S. degrees in physics from Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan in 1987 and 1989, respectively, and Ph.D. degree in crystalline materials science from Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan in 2006.
He joined Toshiba Research and Development Center in 1989, where he was working on micro-cavity semiconductor lasers and strained-SiGe/Si field effect transistors. He also joined two major national project of LSI devices and processes from FY2001 to FY2013 as a member and a group leader. He and his group focused on research and development of strained-SOI, strained SiGe-OI-CMOS device and Ge/III-V CMOS devices. Currently, he is working on novel memory devices and processes in Toshiba Memory Corporation.
Dr. Tezuka won the Japan Society of Applied Physics (JSAP) Award for the Most Promising Young Scientist in 1994, Takuo Sugano Award for Outstanding Far-East Paper (IEEE-ISSCC, 2004), The 2003 Electron Devices Society George E. Smith Award (IEEE EDS, 2004) and JSAP Paper Award in 2016. He is a member of the Physical Society of Japan and the Japan Society of Applied Physics.
Toshiya Sakata
The University of Tokyo
Toshiya Sakata is the Associate Professor of Department of Materials Engineering, School of Engineering at the University of Tokyo in Japan. Having obtained his degree of Ph.D. from Osaka University in 2003, he spent his career working for National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) in Japan before taking up his present position at the University of Tokyo. He has authored over 90 scientific publications and has received several scientific awards, including the 6th Yamazaki-Teiichi Prize Winner (2006) and IEEJ Technical Development Award (2005). Now, he believes that “Semiconductor-based biosensing technology meets Clinical diagnostics”.

SSDM Young Researcher Award

Presentation No. K -3-01

"A new kinetic model for thermal oxidation of Ge"

Xu Wang
The University of Tokyo
Xu Wang received the B. E. and M. E. degree in Materials Physics and Chemistry from Harbin Institute of Technology, China, in 2011 and 2015, respectively. He was engaged in the study of 3D carbon materials in the application of new energy storage devices. In 2011, He joined the Samsung Display Corporation, and had the responsibility for the quality reliability of optical semiconductor devices. In 2015, He entered the University of Tokyo as a PhD student of Materials Engineering. His research interests are the materials science and device physics for scaled CMOS in Ge. Currently he focused on the thermal oxidation mechanism of Ge, which is important for Ge device fabrication.
Presentation No.D-1-02

"Differential Contact RRAM Pair for Advanced CMOS Logic NVM applications"

Wei-Ting Hsieh
National Tsing Hua University
Wei-Ting Hsieh recently received the M.S degree in Electronics Engineering at National Tsing Hua University(NTHU) in 2018. He also completed his B.S degree in Electrical Engineering at NTHU in 2016. He has been engaged in research on RRAM performance enhancement, RRAM memory applications and other emerging memory technologies. He previously word with Dr. C.J Lin and Dr. Y.C King at NTHU to research stability issue in the implementation of large resistive random access memory (RRAM) arrays. Mr. Hsieh will be joining the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company(TSMC) as a research engineer of emerging memory in July, 2018.
Presentation No.F-2-04

"Development of Vertically-Stacked Multi-Shank Si Neural Probe Array with Sharpened Tip for Cubic Spatial Recording"

Takuya Harashima
Tokyo Electron Miyagi Limited
Takuya Harashima received B.E., M.E., and D.E. degrees in engineering from Tohoku University, Japan, in 2012, 2015 and 2018, respectively. In B.E. degree, the laboratory he was associated with researched micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). In M.E. and D.E. degrees, he belonged to Tetsu Tanaka laboratory which researches and developments of biomedical micro/nano integrated systems based on semiconductor neural engineering. In 2018, he joined the Tokyo Electron Miyagi Limited in Japan.
During his M.E. and D.E. work, his research interests included the multifunctional Si neural probe and invasiveness of Si neural probe insertion.
Presentation No.A-2-06

"Current Density Dependence of Asymmetric Magnetoresistance in Pt/Py Bilayers under Various Magnetic Field Strength"

Tian Li
Kyoto University
Tian Li received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemistry from East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST), Shanghai, China, and Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan, respectively. She is currently engaged in the study of magnetism dynamics as a Ph.D. student as well as JSPS Research Fellow DC1, in Kyoto University. She is a member of JPS and JSAP.
Presentation No.J-4-05LN

“Chemical Sensing using Graphene-based Surface-Acoustic-Wave Sensor”

Satoshi Okuda
Mitsubishi Electric Corporation
Satoshi Okuda received the M.S. degree in engineering from Osaka University, Japan in 2012. After joining the Advanced Technology R & D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corp., he has researched energy devices such as solar cells and power devices. In 2014, he entered a doctoral course in Osaka University and started research about graphene FET based biosensors. Especially, he focused on the acoustoelectric effect in graphene. In 2018, he received the Ph. D. degree in engineering. His current interest is sensor devices using low dimensional materials.